Abilio Perla

How dirty waste makes for clean energy

Wastewater treatment plantFor the past few decades, scientists have experimented with using all kinds of waste, from animal to human, to produce methane gas via anaerobic digestion.

As arguably the largest supplier of organic waste, some large-scale farmers have been an instrumental part of the process, working hand-in-hand with researchers as the go-to source for methane-producing waste. Pioneering farms have been using the technology since the 1980s to harness energy to power their operations.

But, the process isn’t just for farmers anymore. Wastewater treatment facilities are getting in on the action. As they explore ways to extract more energy from waste and reduce their operating costs, innovative plants are finding ways to turn more types of waste, including solid food waste, into energy.

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Why grease trap to fuel tank makes sense

Biodiesel storage tankFor the past couple of decades, yellow grease, or used fryer oil, has been the go-to source for biodiesel production. Each gallon of yellow grease produces almost the same volume of biodiesel. 

Though the biodiesel yield is much lower for brown grease (50 percent), pioneering organizations are discovering uses for all types of grease trap waste. Sustainable energy innovators are finding that grease trap waste, if properly processed, can be used in a number of other ways. 

Learn about how new research and technology is creating ways to re-use fats, oil and grease, reducing the impact on the environment and saving money at the same time.

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Nine dos and don'ts for hiring a grease trap pumping contractor

Pump truck cleaning out a grease trapBusiness managers might feel as if their lives revolve around quarters … quarters of the year, that is. From taxes to financial reports and marketing initiatives, managers have a laundry list of tasks to accomplish four times a year. Food service establishment operators have yet one more responsibility to tackle at least once a quarter — the pumping of the grease trap.

Granted, most restaurant and commercial kitchens contract out this dreaded deed, but the manager still must choose a trusted contractor. Working with someone that cuts corners or is frequently tardy could land FSE operators in hot water with their municipalities.

 Because the middle layer of water is what exits the tank, installing a properly sized interceptor — and regular maintenance to ensure the grease and water levels are at appropriate levels — are of utmost importance. Also important, hiriing the right contractor to clean out the grease interceptor periodically. Here are some tips.

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How Asheboro is tackling waste-to-energy projects

Asheboro Wastewater Treatment PlantLike many wastewater treatment facilities, the Asheboro Wastewater Treatment Plant, is under constant pressure to do more with less.

Already, the facility has cut in half the amount of electricity it uses to run the blowers in its two aeration tanks.

But the facility is now looking at some additional innovations to save money by reducing energy costs, reducing waste disposal costs and process even more waste from customers.

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How the Asheboro wastewater treatment plant achieves more with less

Aeration tank at Asheboro wastewater treatment plantThe Asheboro Wastewater Treatment Plant was built in 1962, during a different era. The Cuban Missile Crisis was right around the corner and America had just launched a space race to put the first man on the moon.

At the time, if you had mentioned “Class A biosolids” or “thermophilic bacteria” to a manager or operator at the plant, chances are they would have looked at you as though you had just come from the moon.

But the Asheboro, N.C. plant — even with some infrastructure that dates back more than 50 years — is on the leading edge of wastewater treatment. And it is the plant’s operators and staff that now talk about biosolids, bacteria and other cutting edge practices.

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Health care facilities' unique pretreatment challenges - and how to solve them

Lawrence & Memorial HospitalHospitals and other health care facilities often operate extensive commercial kitchens. But unlike restaurants, hotels and other food service establishments, hospitals face additional cost-control, sanitation and operational challenges.

They have one or more commercial kitchens that may feed effluent into plumbing systems that run for hundreds or thousands of feet before exiting the building. 

Hospitals also operate on a 24/7 basis, requiring them to keep downtime to a minimum. They don’t close for holidays, and their kitchens must keep operating matter what.

These factors mean that hospitals face unique pretreatement challenges. Facility managers and engineers must carefully consider their pretreatment technology, or risk high-cost repairs and even breakdowns that could threaten the health of patients and workers.

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Why size is no excuse for reducing grease pretreatment standards

Outdoor grease interceptorOne size fits all might be an appropriate term for a rain poncho. Or a baseball hat fitted with an elastic band. Perhaps even a baggy pair of sweatpants with a drawstring. But, the term has no place in the world of grease pretreatment. 

For a pretreatment plan to be effective, the effluent rate of a commercial kitchen, along with its size and type of food served, must be considered.

The century-old technology that is the traditional concrete interceptor is still the go-to choice for many food service establishments, despite its numerous problems. These are viable for some facilities — if they have the space. But it’s just not practical for many others. Many establishments, such as strip mall restaurants or restaurants located inside office buildings or in tightly packed urban areas, don’t have the available outdoor space.

But there are other choices.

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Should you go "natural" with biological pre-treatment systems for grease?

Big Dipper Grease InterceptorOrganic and “natural” products and methods enjoy a glowing reputation in the marketplace. They’re able to command higher prices and for many people are a preferred choice when there is a choice.

They’ve made inroads beyond food, too, to products such as apparel (made with organically grown cotton), cosmetics and a variety of products constructed from “sustainable” recycled materials.

It’s not surprising, then, that restaurants and other commercial kitchen operators are interested in biological methods of pretreating grease-laden kitchen effluent. Beyond the attraction of a biologically based treatment system, these methods also hold out the possibility of minimizing pumping and other maintenance required by mechanical separation systems.

But while enzymatic and bacterial treatment solutions are growing in popularity, many questions and challenges remain.

Before considering enzymatic or bacterial solutions, there are a number of factors you need to consider.

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How a river catching fire led to cleaner water

Discharging sewage into Cuyahoga RiverIn 1969, the Cuyahoga River in Ohio caught fire.

The blaze caught the attention of the national media, and Time magazine described the Cuyahoga as a river that “oozes,” rather than flows. There were no fish or other animals in the water, and the concentration of oil and other toxins was so thick that they could actually burn.

The river had become, in effect, a giant grease trap.

And the ’69 fire was not event the first time the river had caught fire, and it by Cuyahoga standards, it was relatively mild. Dating back to the 1860s, the river had caught on fire at least 13 times. In 1952, the largest such fire caused more than $1 million of damage to boats, docks and a riverfront building. But the 1969 fire had a major impact on efforts to clean up the nation's waterways.

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How Narragansett Bay reaped the rewards of wastewater pretreatment

Narragansett Bay seen from Providence, R.I., 1850-1920.The damage that grease and other pollutants can inflict on the environment is well documented, but few cases illustrate this as well as Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island.

Narragansett Bay is a prime example of what untreated sewage can do to the environment. However, it’s also a great case study in how pretreatment can help turn around polluted waterways and help reverse the impact of pollution.

The problem began in the 18th century when Rhode Islanders would empty their raw sewage directly into their nearby rivers that flowed into the bay. By the 1970s, nearly 65 million gallons of untreated sewage was flowing into Rhode Island’s waters each day. Grease deposits the size of soccer balls were sometimes seen floating in the bay. The bay’s shellfish beds, which had created a booming industry, were closed.

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Why rural food service establishments should pretreat

Rural septic fieldIf you live in a rural area, chances are good that you use a septic system to treat your wastewater. If that’s the case, you’re probably careful about what goes down the drain and into the tank. You might, for example, pour any used cooking oil or grease into a disposable container and toss it into the garbage can. Sound familiar?

Though that might be standard practice for residences with on-site sewage management, it’s not exactly a feasible option for commercial entities that produce a high volume of grease, such as restaurants and resorts. To maintain an effective sewage treatment system free of grease clogs, pretreatment is vital.

Keeping grease out of your local sewage system — whether it's a septic field or another treatment process — will save you money and prevent maintenance headaches in the future.

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Schools require pretreatment options that meet unique challenges

Students and workers in a school cafeteriaA packed-to-the-gills restaurant during dinner rush doesn’t hold a candle to the hustle and bustle — both in and out of the kitchen — of a middle school cafeteria during the lunch hour.

While most restaurants have a leisurely dining room turnover, hundreds of students are cycled through the lunch line and sent out the door with full bellies every thirty minutes in a cafeteria setting. This presents a challenge not only for the front of the house cafeteria staff, but also requires a pretreatment plan that can go with the flow … literally.

School cafeterias feed hundreds — maybe even thousands — of children over a very short period of time. Sometimes, even twice a day. Every aspect of the operation, from the staff to the grease interceptor, needs to run like a well-oiled machine. One clog, one overflow or glitch could shut down the kitchen in an instant. 

But there are solutions.

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You might be surprised at all the ways grease interceptors protect the environment

Clean river waterThe federal government takes grease seriously. Very seriously. In fact, the Department of Justice is ready, and willing, to issue federal jail time to any individual who knowingly violates the Clean Water Act, a standing tenet of which is proper grease disposal.

Just ask Mobile, Ala.’s DHS Inc. In 2011, the president and manager were charged in a 43-count indictment with violations of the Clean Water Act, as well as conspiracy and fraud. Their company, which was hired to remove the FOGs from grease interceptors, was, ironically, allegedly dumping the collected grease directly into local sewer systems — the same systems they were being paid to protect.

Grease interceptors do more than just keep fats, oils and grease out of the wastewater system. Properly maintained grease intereceptors protect your community's environment in a number of ways.

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Is it time to dump standardized regulations?

Old barnImagine taking a paintbrush to the broadside of an old barn: Your goal is probably to cover the expanse uniformly with one color. But the result would likely be a lot different if you didn’t consider the number of boards you might have to replace, holes that need patching or nails that need to be driven back into the wood.

If you started blindly painting away without paying attention to each issue, you’d waste time, money and valuable resources.This same principle can be applied to standardized regulations in today’s economy. In an effort to comply with such uniform regulations, businesses waste valuable resources. 

A standardized approach can be more expensive, less effective, and less flexible than other approaches. There are alternatives, though.

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Prescriptive vs. performance-based regulations — which are better?

There’s no reason why a sandwich shop or an ice cream parlor should be required to use same pretreatment system as a steakhouse … right?Ice cream shop

Wastewater regulations today are often prescriptive, which means that one standard method of pretreatment is required for each of the food service establishments, or other commercial kitchens, in a municipality. Wouldn’t it make more sense, though, to create sanitary codes and ask businesses to develop their own methods of compliance?

Performance-based rules might not only do a better job, but could be cheaper in the long run, too.

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How pretreatment can extend the life of your aging sewer infrastructure

Aging sewer system manhole coverThe EPA estimates the total number miles of sewer lines snaking across the country to be about 1.2 million. Considering some of these lines are over 100 years old, local governments will spend billions of dollars modernizing failing wastewater systems over the next 10 to 20 years.

Because this aging infrastructure has survived decades of wear, tear and obstruction, decreasing its capability to withstand heavy demands, the probability of blockages and backups increases over time. And those blockages and backups are very likely to lead to the release of pollutants.

Not only do those pollutants threaten public health, they can also lead to fines and other enforcement actions from state and federal agencies. But there are things that regulators and waste water system users can do to reduce the burden on aging treatment systems, decrease costs and increase efficiencies.

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Why concrete interceptors ought to be left in the history books

Concrete grease trapIn 1884, Nathaniel Whiting patented the first grease interceptor design. These oversized, concrete boxes are still the default choice for many in the food-service industry.

Though innovative at the time, the design of these concrete interceptors has changed very little over the past 130 years and is fraught with problems in today’s world. 

Traditional concrete interceptors range in size from 300 or so gallons to several thousand. Though there are a few different designs, they all rely on the same principle — gravity.

Wastewater from a commercial kitchen flows down through the tank, where food particles sink to the bottom and oil rises to the top. The grease-free water in the middle then exits the tank and enters the public sewage lines.

Though these grease interceptors do the job, they don't necessarily do it well, do it efficiently or do it economically.  

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Grease interceptor design: A life-or-death decision

Hydrogen sulfide warning signThink about the grease interceptor in your food service establishment.

You’ve seen it labor on through long days, lunch rushes followed by full-house dinners — the silent workhorse of the kitchen that helps keep your commercial kitchen environmentally friendly.

But, did you know that the design of your grease trap could have potentially devastating effects on the health of your kitchen staff?

When not properly designed and maintained, grease traps can become a breeding ground for bacteria that release hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a pungent and sometimes deadly gas. This gas can cause health problems, which is bad enough. In addition, though, the gas can damage some grease interceptors, reducing their lifespans and creating potentially higher costs.

Fortunately, this isn't inevitable. Learn more about the dangers of hydrogen sulfide and how that should figure into your grease intereceptor decisions. 

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5 Tools for an effective pretreatment program

Test tubes

It’s been said many times: “The best defense is a good offense.” 

Noncompliance with pretreatment regulations creates serious problems, both for the violator and for the wastewater system operator.

While ordinances, fines and consistent enforcement are essential, they are not sufficient for effective pretreatment. After all, the goal of a pretreatment program is to maintain water quality, reduce the load on water treatment plants and minimize sewer system maintenance costs.

The best way to achieve those goals is to prevent pretreatment ordinance violations in the first place.

Here are five key tools that every effective pretreatment program should have. Combined, these elements can reduce the enforcement burden while also maintaining a cleaner, more efficient wastewater treatment system.

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A primer on commercial kitchen FOG waste

Frying eggs and baconIt’s not very often that wastewater system workers are hailed as heroes in the headlines around the world. But in August 2013, that’s what happened.

News media around the world picked up the story of London’s ‘fatberg,’ a bus-sized, 33,000-pound mass of fats, oils and grease that had clogged an 8-foot diameter sewer line.

The English newspaper The Guardian reported:

A sewage worker has become an unlikely hero after taking three weeks to defeat a toxic 15-tonne ball of congealed fat the size of a bus that came close to turning parts of the London borough of Kingston upon Thames into a cesspit.”

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Why point-source grease interceptors may be the ideal choice


W-250-IS Model 40kIf you own a restaurant or other business within the foodservice industry, chances are good you’re already using some sort of grease interceptor. If not, sooner or later you’ll likely face clogged pipes, back-ups into your kitchen and costly fines.

In the United States, there are three types of grease interceptors generally found within the foodservice industry: small passive hydromechanical grease interceptors (sometimes referred to as grease traps), larger grease interceptors made out of plastic, fiberglass, steel or concrete, and automatic grease removal devices. Though using any of these options is better than nothing, all grease traps are not created equally and, as technology improves, so do grease interceptors.

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Five ways to make your commercial kitchen safer

Chefs in motionPicture a commercial kitchen during peak rush -- the staff hurriedly prepares food while wait staff bustles in to retrieve orders and bring in stacks of dirty dishes, all in the presence of hot ovens, slippery floors and boiling pots. 

So, what can you do to make sure your kitchen is as safe as possible? Check out the tips below. Read on to learn some basic safety principles and tips that can help reduce the risk of injury, decrease insurance costs and keep your commercial kitchen running smoothly. 

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Replacing a grease trap? Here's a few factors to consider

Big Dipper grease interceptor

Replacing a hydromechanical grease interceptor, also referred to as a grease trap, can be smelly, expensive and unpleasant. But if you operate a food service establishment and need a new one, you don’t have much choice.

In nearly all jurisdictions, commercial kitchens are required to have a grease interceptor to keep fats, oil and grease out of the sewer system. Coagulated grease is responsible for thousands — perhaps millions — of sewer blockages around the world, are expensive to clear and make sewer systems more costly to operate.

Your existing grease trap may have corroded or degraded so much that it no longer works.

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Understanding your plumbing inspector's view

Beakers of clean and dirty waterDon’t accuse a plumbing inspector (PI) of blindly following a bloated set of bureaucratic rules for no good reason. Yes, a plumbing inspector’s job is to enforce the plumbing code. Yes, a plumbing inspector will likely be suspicious of anything that deviates from that code.

But plumbing inspectors have good reasons for following the plumbing code (and so do you). In fact, good plumbing inspectors can help you, your business and your community by preventing long-term problems. Here's how they approach the job.

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Big Dipper digital control optimized for rotisserie ovens

Rotisserie chickenCommercial rotisserie ovens, which are popping up in more grocery stores as well as some restaurants and institutional settings, bring with them some unusual challenges when it comes to managing grease. Seasonal fluctuations in demand for rotisserie-cooked poultry pose some unusual challenges for grease removal, which a new Big Dipper feature resolves. 

(Photo courtesy of Steve Parker / Creative Commons on Flickr)

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Six ways your commercial kitchen might be out of compliance

Chef and Waiter discussing menu

You always score a solid "A" during health department inspections.

You make sure your fire extinguishers and other safety gear is regularly inspected.

And if something goes wrong with a piece of equipment, you immediately call a service technician and get it fixed.

While you may think you’re doing everything you could, and everything you should, to keep your commercial kitchen in compliance with government regulations, there are still a few surprises that could trip you up.

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How to size a grease trap for a commercial kitchen

Kitchen Drain CloseupWhether it’s a small, neighborhood pizza place or a large, institutional cafeteria that runs 24/7, installing the correctly sized grease trap is critical.

Install a unit that’s too small, and you risk overflows and messy back-ups in the kitchen. Install a unit (or units) that are too large, though, and you’ll end up with a different kind of waste – money flushed down the drain.

However, the methods used in many plumbing codes to estimate grease trap size requirements tend to overestimate peak flow, and therefore can overestimate the unit capacity needed. 

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Increases in Eating Out Put More Pressure on Pretreatment

Sandwich and friesChanging demographics and lifestyles are producing greater strains on water treatment systems and could threaten water quality. Surprised? It’s true. And we’re not just talking about the strain of a growing population.
 
Since the 1970s, the amount of food consumed at restaurants or purchased from take-out spots has increased dramatically. And with that, comes more commercial kitchen wastewater entering the sewers.
 
2006 USDA study, for example, found that from the 1970s to the 1990s, the percent of daily calories from meals purchased away from home increased from 18 percent to 32 percent. And from 1974 to 2004, away-from-home spending grew from 34 percent of total food dollars to about half of all food expenditures.
 

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Trapzilla, A Thermaco Technology, making a difference in worldwide effort to deliver clean water

Mexico CityASHEBORO, N.C. — Water runs from our taps, and we store it in bottles, coolers and refrigerators.
 
Clean, cool and crisp. We take it for granted.
 
Much of the world isn’t so fortunate.
 
While the world population has tripled in the 20th century, the use of renewable water resources has grown six-fold according to water.org, which works to promote clean water sources throughout the world.
 
Thermaco, a leader in the highly specialized field of oil and grease extraction from wastewater, considers this to be an important part of its mission.
 
“Thermaco strives to make relevant products for water pretreatment that enable food service providers to be better stewards of the sewer collection systems of which they are a part,” says Yaralitza A. Erives, Director of Customer Service and Sales at Thermaco.

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Alpha Biofuels - Offering a Clean Solution to Growth in Singapore

Alpha BioFuelsSingapore –- the East Asian city-state –- is known worldwide as a leader in urban cleanliness and environmental stewardship. Visitors to Singapore discover a bustling multicultural metropolis where towering skyscrapers soar above charming British colonial architectural, and where an abundance of tourist sites, glamorous shopping centers, and food courts buzz with activity seven days a week. As one of the world’s most densely populated metropolitan areas, both the government and citizens of Singapore are proud of the nation’s leadership in urban efficiency, quality of life, and environmentalism.

 

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Suggestions for Reducing Detergent/Lipid Emulsions:

Commercial Kitchen DishwasherKeep Soapy flows from Contacting Downstream Fats and Oils (Lipids)

A commercial dishwasher’s output is hot, soapy water and is ALWAYS running richer than needed in terms of detergent chemicals. Why?  Because it is a far lesser evil to send unused detergent (high in BOD) with sanitizers (chlorides) and water softening agents (a variety of mineral grabbing stuff so as to leave no spots on the washed ware) THAN to have a potential sanitary hazard imposed on the community’s dining customers, i.e. dirty dishes.  Sending a commercial dishwasher’s output through the kitchen’s drainage plumbing emulsifies any and all fats or oils in its route, including the retained grease and oils in a conventional downstream grease separator.  Notice the wording “conventional”.  Anytime a warm (usually no longer hot by that time) soapy flow enters a conventional (think traditional inlet and outlet configuration), it rises “lava lamp” style and displaces the cold water already in the separator.  As the cold water layer falls, it tugs on the underside of the trapped grease mat, adding some gentle mixing action.

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Understanding Kitchen Ware Washing: Detergents and Scrapping Practices

Soapy BubblesBetter Practices in the Modern Era

We are thankful to live in the 21st century and to not worry about dying from a restaurant dining experience.  I once worked with a man whose 20 year-old brother died in 1940 of food poisoning from a restaurant with poor sanitation.  As recently as the late 1940s, hot water heaters were not reliable and ware-washing detergents were caustic based.  If the water was not hot, the detergent was not effective.  Today’s modern restaurant has plenty of hot water, highly efficient detergents and those detergents also contain sanitizers and water softening agents to ensure complete sanitation and cleaning takes place. 

Today we have better sanitation practices and the plates are always clean, but how about what is being sent down the drain?  Does it pose a problem for the community’s sewer collection system?  Can the constituents be treated at the community’s wastewater treatment plant? 

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Fresh and Healthy Asian-inspired Food with Quick Service – Panda Express

Panda Express

In our role as a trusted solutions provider for restaurant oil and grease compliance, Thermaco is honored to work with a number of highly successful restaurant brands – some founded upon interesting and inspirational methods of business.

With this post we share one such story…

One of the fastest growing quick-serve restaurants in America, Panda Restaurant Group was founded in 1973 in Pasadena, California, when Andrew Cherng opened the first Panda Inn, with his father Master Chef Ming-Tsai Cherng. Today, the privately held company has grown to 1,582 restaurants in 42 states, Puerto Rico and Mexico, with revenue topping $1.7 billion – truly a world leader in the Asian dining experience.

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What’s Your Flatulence Suffering Preference?

Pumping out TrapzillaA Long Poot or a Short Toot?

The smell was putrid, foreign, the caller said.

The strange odor, which emanated from somewhere on the college campus, stung the nostrils of the untrained and the unsuspecting.

But mostly the smell, characteristic of rotten eggs, was making people afraid.
What is it? What can it be?

The students wrongly assumed the awful smells were from hazardous chemicals. Someone called in a Hazmat team, and buildings were evacuated.

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Food Equipment & Supplies Features

Trapzilla FightFood Equipment and Supplies Magazine recently sent out an E-Newsletter featuring the Trapzilla line of products.  Take a moment to check out the articles below and stop by the Trapzilla website to see the award-winning animated short-film.

Foodservice operators have more options than ever when buying and installing grease interceptors, but that wasn’t always the case. The choices were few and certainly not optimal — either deal with the maintenance issues  involving a smaller, internal unit or find the space and invest in a large exterior concrete tank. A necessary inconvenience, some operators thought.

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Childhood Memories Inspire FOG Program Pioneer

Cartoon FoxWhen Michelle Aumiller was a kid growing up in Oklahoma, she loved jumping in mud puddles.

Today, though, in her role as a municipal Industrial Waste Monitor, she knows that sanitary sewer overflows can turn a child’s mud puddle into a serious health hazard.

“By protecting our sewer lines and waste treatment plants from FOG (fats, oil and grease) and other contaminants,” Aumiller says, “we keep waste water from contaminating the environment and mud puddles – for our children and grandchildren.”

Six years ago, when Aumiller took on the position of Industrial Waste Monitor for Midwest City, Oklahoma, the municipality was experiencing serious problems with Sanitary Sewer Overflows (SSO).

“The city was under a Consent Order by the state Department of Environmental Quality and was facing large fines for the overflows,” according to Aumiller. “The first thing I did was write a letter that the sewer line crew distributed to homes, restaurants and businesses -- explaining the problem that we were having with FOG and other clogging materials and providing information on best practices to help solve the problem.”

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Trapzilla Saves the Day for a Historic Town in North Carolina

Arnold AllredWith more than 37 years of experience in municipal wastewater treatment, Arnold Allred knows about the problems that restaurant oil and grease can cause for wastewater collection systems and treatment plants. 

Allred began his career in wastewater management in 1974, when right out of high school he landed a job “turning valves” with the City of Asheboro’s wastewater plant.  He stayed with the treatment facility for 30 years, working his way to plant superintendent.  After retiring from the City of Asheboro, Allred began serving as Public Works...  

  

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Thermaco joins Southeastern United States - Canadian Provinces (SEUS-CP) Alliance Conference

SEUS-CP Alliance ConferenceHeld on May 20-22 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, the 2012 SEUS-CP Alliance Conference brought together 300 high-level governmental and business leaders  -- all sharing the common goal of enhancing strategic trade and investment between the United States and Canada. 

Focusing on advanced manufacturing, technology, and a green economy, SEUS provided Thermaco representatives an opportunity to meet with Canadian government officials from Ontario, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Newfoundland & Labrador, Manitoba, and Quebec to share ideas about regulating FOG (fat, oil and grease) produced by Canadian restaurants.  
 

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CromaCollege 2012

cromacollegeCromaglass’ CromaCollege showcases continual improvement in on-site wastewater technology


Education never ends.

My hunger to learn, to discover, to teach doesn’t cease or wane.
 
It’s those desires that led me to Cromaglass’ CromaCollege, held April 23-24 in Williamsport, Pa.
 

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Why should we care about Grease?

Greasy Frying PanRestaurants, caterers, cafeterias and other entities involved in preparing and cooking large quantities of food are — well, should be — knowledgeable in regard to the proper ways of discarding waste, specifically grease that could clog drains and pipes and ultimately harm sewer systems. 

But what about the home cook, the person charged with doing the dishes or cleaning the kitchen?

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How We Came To Understand Thermal Inversion

Thermaco accidentally stumbled into an answer for grease trap thermal inversion. and, at the time, did not know it. In mid-2003 we were working on developing high capacity/small footprint grease separators capable of meeting the ASME A112.14.3 Standard. This is the separation efficiency and retention capacity certification standard for passive (non-automatic) grease separators.

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